ACLU & NWIRP sue US Gov’t to provide lawyers for child migrants

July 9, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Uncategorized 
Dear Lois,

Just this morning here in Seattle, NWIRP and a coalition of partners filed a national class action lawsuit against the federal government challenging its failure to provide legal representation to thousands of children facing deportation proceedings in immigration court.

 

Let me tell you why.

 

Three of our clients – a 10-year-old boy, his 13-year old brother, and 15-year old sister in El Salvador – watched their father be murdered in front of their eyes. The father had been targeted because he and the mother ran Read more

Central American child refugees – how you can help!

July 7, 2014 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Uncategorized 
Background on what is happening in Central America: 
Many of you have asked how you can help Central American refugees throughout the border region. Below is a list that the Southern Border Communities Coalition (SBCC) has compiled of places where you can donate supplies, volunteer your time, or make a financial contribution to support the refugees, most of whom are mothers and children, who are arriving with little more than the clothes on their back. Our border communities are opening our hearts and lending what help we can, but the need is great and your support is extraordinarily important.   Here are the ways that you can help.


In California
In Arizona

War on the Border

August 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: News 

By TODD MILLER   Published: August 17, 2013    169 Comments

THREE generations of Loews have worked the family’s 63 acres in Amado, Ariz. In the last 20 years, the Loew family harvested thousands of pounds of onions, garlic and pumpkins without incident. So Stewart Loew, 44, who was born and raised on the farm, was surprised when he went to irrigate his fields one night and found himself surrounded by federal agents.

Pointing to the fires about 200 feet away that Mr. Loew lit to keep warm while he irrigated his fields, one of the agents slogged out of the ankle deep water in the irrigation ditch and asked Mr. Loew what he was doing.

“I’m irrigating, dude,” said Mr. Loew, who was in his pajamas. “What are you doing?”

“Don’t ‘dude’ me, I’m a federal officer,” the Border Patrol agent said, and demanded Mr. Loew’s identification.

Since Mr. Loew did not carry his wallet in his pajama pocket, the agents followed him into his house; a local police officer, who knew the Loew family, had already arrived, vouched for Mr. Loew’s identity and assured the federal agents that Mr. Loew posed no threat to the homeland or national security, and the agents left without comment or apology.

This kind of brush with law enforcement would have been unthinkable to previous generations of farmers here. But these run-ins have become increasingly common in the rugged, hilly desert stretch along the southern borderlands where, in the post-9/11 world, everyone — even farmers in pajamas — is a potential threat. Read more

Next Page »