New Resource Available for Non-Native English Speakers “Know your Rights”

October 8, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Uncategorized 
New Resource Available for Non-Native English Speakers “Know your Rights”
The Boston College Migration and Human Rights Project, alongside our partners Women Encouraging Empowerment and Casa El Salvador, is proud to share two units of our “Know Your Rights-English for Speakers of Other Languages Tool Kit.” The materials – including an introductory letter, teachers’ guides and student lesson handouts can be found here:  http://www.bc.edu/content/bc/centers/humanrights/resources/esol-kyr-toolkit.html . The materials were developed in conjunction with a legal team so legal information is infused throughout the lessons, and more additional information is included in “FAQ” sheets accompanying the teacher’s guide for each lesson.
Why was the Tool Kit created?
The Tool Kit was created to weave rights literacy into ESOL instruction.  Read more

What is being an American? Immigration activist Jose Antonio Vargas has some ideas.

August 12, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
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LOS ANGELES TIMESpatt.morrison@latimes.com

In July, Jose Antonio Vargas was arrested trying to board a plane for L.A. for a screening of his film “Documented,” about his life before and after he “outed” himself as an undocumented immigrant living in the U.S. for decades. For the first time since he began living openly without papers in 2011, he will have to appear before an immigration judge. In the meantime, he continues his Define American campaign, challenging this country to acknowledge him and those like him as Americans. And he’s moving back to California from the East Coast, to the state where he grew up and one of 11 in the country that will issue him an honest-to-goodness driver’s license.

What happens to you now?

There’s no date yet. As you know, immigration courts are so backed up, I don’t know how long that’s going to take.

So, paradoxically, your only official U.S. document now is for a court date?

Basically!

You’ve written that your high profile protects you.

I fly with my Filipino passport that doesn’t have a visa. I have been traveling all across the country going through airport security. I get to south Texas and realize I’m trapped; I didn’t know there would be Border Patrol agents at the airport. What do I do? I write an essay for Politico that I’m trapped! Read more

War on the Border

August 18, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: News 

By TODD MILLER   Published: August 17, 2013    169 Comments

THREE generations of Loews have worked the family’s 63 acres in Amado, Ariz. In the last 20 years, the Loew family harvested thousands of pounds of onions, garlic and pumpkins without incident. So Stewart Loew, 44, who was born and raised on the farm, was surprised when he went to irrigate his fields one night and found himself surrounded by federal agents.

Pointing to the fires about 200 feet away that Mr. Loew lit to keep warm while he irrigated his fields, one of the agents slogged out of the ankle deep water in the irrigation ditch and asked Mr. Loew what he was doing.

“I’m irrigating, dude,” said Mr. Loew, who was in his pajamas. “What are you doing?”

“Don’t ‘dude’ me, I’m a federal officer,” the Border Patrol agent said, and demanded Mr. Loew’s identification.

Since Mr. Loew did not carry his wallet in his pajama pocket, the agents followed him into his house; a local police officer, who knew the Loew family, had already arrived, vouched for Mr. Loew’s identity and assured the federal agents that Mr. Loew posed no threat to the homeland or national security, and the agents left without comment or apology.

This kind of brush with law enforcement would have been unthinkable to previous generations of farmers here. But these run-ins have become increasingly common in the rugged, hilly desert stretch along the southern borderlands where, in the post-9/11 world, everyone — even farmers in pajamas — is a potential threat. Read more

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